February adoptions

By Sarah Rebernick, V.P. & Adoption Coordinator

Jeordi

Jeordi

Handsome Jeordi, a 3-year-old sable/white male, has been adopted and will be living in Wisconsin. This fun-loving boy spent the first part of his life on a farm but it was not the right fit for him and now he is enjoying an indoor lifestyle ;-). He will share his new home with a big brother MWCR collie who will be happy to teach him all about the good life.

 

Chip

Chip

 

 

Sweet senior Chip, a 10-year-old sable/white male, was adopted this weekend and will be also be living in Wisconsin. He came into rescue due to his owner’s health issues and loves nothing more than to hang out on the couch. His favorite things are cuddles and pets and his new mom and dad are happy to give him an endless supply ūüôā

 

 

Paisley

Paisley

 

 

 

Tiny bundle of cuteness, Paisley, a 9-week-old tricolor female, has been adopted and will be living in Wisconsin. She will be sharing her new life with her mom, assorted human siblings and a lovely Lhasa mix. Paisley is such a sweet, smart little girl and her new family is already head over heels for her ūüôā

 

 

Adoption update: Millie (fka Bliss)

MillieI just wanted to let you know how Millie is doing and pass along a picture. She is such an amazing dog and she and our older collie, Maddie, have become inseparable. They always lay next to each other and Maddie lays by the front door when we take Millie out for runs until we get back. Millie has also become very attached to our two girls and will always lay near them while they are playing. We feel so lucky to have found her and could not have asked for a better addition to our house.
Thank you again for everything! –¬†Carly

Buck, the sledding collie

Submitted by Deborah Franks

Buck_March coverOn the heels of a mega snow storm on the east coast, I thought back to some snow days we have had with our dogs. Our fur family is mostly collie/collie mixes with a hound and an inheritance mixed in.

Our late Austin, a blue merle collie, loved to eat snow. Especially the snow that collected on the bench in the yard. Our hound, Sunny, loves to run through it. Of course, she just loves to run anyway. Even in the warmth of the summer. Hannah, our collie/sheltie mix, will throw herself down into the snow, wiggle around in it, and then push herself into a slide down the short hill in the yard. But our star is our collie/border collie, Buck. Anyone who knows our Buck knows what a character he is. You never know what he will figure out in that amazing brain of his. Some days, I swear he is part human. He is a legend in the rescue we adopted him from.

Shortly after we moved to central New York, we got our first taste of a ‚Äúlake¬†effect‚ÄĚ winter. Snow here, in the winter, can seem continuous at times. The good¬†part is, our snow is great for winter sports. We even got our first taste of¬†snowmobiling as there are trails everywhere here. It was the first time we had¬†ever seen a snowmobile pull up to the gas pumps, fill up, and take off into a field.

Buck sleddingBut I digress. During one of our first snow storms, Rich (my hubby), brought out an¬†old ‚ÄėSnowWing‚Äô sled he found in his travels. It was big enough that, as he got¬†ready to head down the hill, he could pile on a dog or two with him. Any of the¬†dogs, that were interested, could take a ride down the hill. For almost an hour,¬†Rich played with the dogs on the hill in our backyard. Buck hitched a ride as often¬†as he could. When he wasn‚Äôt on the sled, he was running alongside of it. He never¬†seemed to tire. Buck even figured out how to grab the rope and pull the sled back¬†up the hill. Of course we laughed as we know how smart he is.

Rich finally got tired and decided that he had had enough. He propped the sled up against the fence, near the house, and came inside. As we pulled our snow gear off, I looked up and saw Buck. He wasn’t done yet. Buck wanted to keep sledding. He had managed to pull the sled down off the fence. He aimed it down the hill and had his two left legs on the sled while he used his two right legs to push himself forward, like a skateboard. I quickly called Rich and we watched in amazement as Buck hopped onto the sled, sat down, and headed down the hill. When he reached the bottom, he grabbed the rope in his mouth and headed back up to the top to go again. We let him go one more time on his own. When he returned the second time, Rich took the sled away from him. Buck wasn’t a happy camper but, as it was a weekend, we weren’t up for a trip to the emergency vet if he hurt himself. Rich was going to prop the sled back against the fence but, as Buck had already figured out how to pull it down, I suggested he put the sled outside of the fence. I could see the wheels spinning in Buck’s head as he tried to figure out how he was going to get the sled. He quickly gave up though.

Thankfully.

We all headed inside to sit near the warm woodstove while Rich and I had some hot tea. Another exhausting, yet enjoyable, Buck escapade behind us. Never a dull moment in the life of our Buck.